Bike lanes (2) “style sheets”

In the previous post on bike lanes I said that it would be good to prepare an overview of cycle lanes, so that designers can pick the design best suited to their project; and I suggested that tThere are at least four different ways:

  1. By defining a structured listing of bike lane types
  2. By “good practice” style sheets
  3. By standardising terms
  4. By defining bike lane types

The list item (b) above refers to “style sheets”. What I mean by these is a single page of information which combines

  • a graphic of the bike lane
  • technical details such as road traffic flows and speeds
  • General text on which circumstances the bike lane type is most suited to

Such style sheets are (or should be) available for other road design elements as well. Here are two examples of “bike lane style sheets”, taken from different, English-language publications:

 

Washington County Bicycle facility design toolkit (USA 2012) – buffered bike lane

A good style sheet – images and photos on one side, technical details and general text on the other side, all on a single page.  The layout is used consistently in the document to present notes on other types of bike lanes.

bike lane 2-1

Los Angeles 2010 bicycle plan, technical design handbook (USA 2011) – bike lane with no on-street parking

Another good style sheet – images and photos on one side, technical details and general text on the other side, all on a single page.  The same layout is used in the document to present examples of other types of bike lanes.

bike lane 2-2

References
• Ref. 2402 Washington County Bicycle facility design toolkit (USA 2012)
• Ref. 917 Los Angeles 2010 bicycle plan, technical design handbook (USA 2011)

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About roadnotes

Robert Bartlett is an international consultant with over 30 years of professional experience as a highway and traffic engineer with leading companies and organisations in several countries, including Germany, China (Hong Kong), Qatar and the UK. Specialised in urban studies, transport and the use of GIS, research has included new ideas on subjects such as the study of social justice using GIS, the dimensions of vehicles, and comparative geometrics (highways and transport).
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